Potential Skills Shortages in the NI IT and Electronic Engineering Sectors and Inequalities in Educational Uptake

2.50
HDL Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/13839
Title:
Potential Skills Shortages in the NI IT and Electronic Engineering Sectors and Inequalities in Educational Uptake
Authors:
Osborne, Bob; Shuttleworth, Ian
Abstract:
The Report draws attention to a number of factors which impact on career decisions and in the case of the sectors in question identified subject choice at secondary school level as the major influence. The research shows that disproportionately fewer women, and to a much lesser extent Catholics, have been taking Maths and Science subjects at ‘A’ level. In the case of the latter group the difference has been narrowing over time. Interestingly the Report shows that females fared better at Maths and Science than did boys, that the fall-off can be found between GCSE and ‘A’ level, and that fewer females achieving the necessary entry-level qualifications apply for IT and Electronic Degree courses. Interestingly the Report shows that females fared better at Maths and Science than did boys, that the fall-off can be found between GCSE and ‘A’ level, and that fewer females achieving the necessary entry-level qualifications apply for IT and Electronic Degree courses.
Issue Date:
Jun-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/13839
Additional Links:
http://www.delni.gov.uk/index/publications/pubs-misc.htm
Type:
Project Report
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
DEL Reports

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOsborne, Bob-
dc.contributor.authorShuttleworth, Ianen
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-02T08:45:55Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-02T08:45:55Z-
dc.date.issued2003-06-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2428/13839-
dc.description.abstractThe Report draws attention to a number of factors which impact on career decisions and in the case of the sectors in question identified subject choice at secondary school level as the major influence. The research shows that disproportionately fewer women, and to a much lesser extent Catholics, have been taking Maths and Science subjects at ‘A’ level. In the case of the latter group the difference has been narrowing over time. Interestingly the Report shows that females fared better at Maths and Science than did boys, that the fall-off can be found between GCSE and ‘A’ level, and that fewer females achieving the necessary entry-level qualifications apply for IT and Electronic Degree courses. Interestingly the Report shows that females fared better at Maths and Science than did boys, that the fall-off can be found between GCSE and ‘A’ level, and that fewer females achieving the necessary entry-level qualifications apply for IT and Electronic Degree courses.en
dc.format.extent315455 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.delni.gov.uk/index/publications/pubs-misc.htmen
dc.titlePotential Skills Shortages in the NI IT and Electronic Engineering Sectors and Inequalities in Educational Uptakeen
dc.typeProject Reporten
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