A Shared Humanity. Using Literature To Develop The Global Dimension For Key Stage Four Pupils (And Above) In Northern Ireland: An Investigation

2.50
HDL Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/14472
Title:
A Shared Humanity. Using Literature To Develop The Global Dimension For Key Stage Four Pupils (And Above) In Northern Ireland: An Investigation
Authors:
Hanratty, Brian
Abstract:
This paper investigates the possibilities in using carefully selected literature to develop various aspects of the global dimension in the school curriculum for Key Stage Four pupils (and above) in Northern Ireland – and, by implication, for pupils at a similar stage in schools in the Republic of Ireland and Britain. The texts chosen for detailed scrutiny, and evaluation of their pedagogical potential, focus on three main themes – conflict resolution, postcolonialism and issues around diversity and interculturalism, and environmental issues; other relevant concerns, however, such as anti-racism, are also acknowledged. Before identifying a range of relevant texts, and providing detailed critical evaluation of a representative selection, the paper offers a quick sketch of some government and curricular initiatives focused on the global dimension, and glances, briefly, at the sometimes contested role which schools themselves can play in the global context. While acknowledging, also, the problematic relationship between cultural pursuits, including the study of literature, and ethical behaviour, emphasis is placed on the key significance of using a dialogical model of education when teaching literature. Although the main focus of the paper is an investigation of texts suitable for Key Stage Four pupils, it is argued, in the conclusion, that a range of appropriate literary texts can also be identified and utilised for younger pupils. Reference is also made, in the concluding section, to complementary research by the present author which reported on the classroom field-testing of some ‘Troubles’ literature similar to that identified in the current paper; in the earlier research, however, the target group was a representative selection of sixth-formers from across Belfast’s ghettoised communities, and the exclusive focus was conflict resolution.
Issue Date:
6-Nov-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/14472
Additional Links:
http://www.iacsee.org/journal.php
Submitted date:
2007
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Journal Papers

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHanratty, Brian-
dc.date.accessioned2007-11-06T14:08:44Z-
dc.date.available2007-11-06T14:08:44Z-
dc.date.issued2007-11-06T14:08:44Z-
dc.date.submitted2007-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2428/14472-
dc.description.abstractThis paper investigates the possibilities in using carefully selected literature to develop various aspects of the global dimension in the school curriculum for Key Stage Four pupils (and above) in Northern Ireland – and, by implication, for pupils at a similar stage in schools in the Republic of Ireland and Britain. The texts chosen for detailed scrutiny, and evaluation of their pedagogical potential, focus on three main themes – conflict resolution, postcolonialism and issues around diversity and interculturalism, and environmental issues; other relevant concerns, however, such as anti-racism, are also acknowledged. Before identifying a range of relevant texts, and providing detailed critical evaluation of a representative selection, the paper offers a quick sketch of some government and curricular initiatives focused on the global dimension, and glances, briefly, at the sometimes contested role which schools themselves can play in the global context. While acknowledging, also, the problematic relationship between cultural pursuits, including the study of literature, and ethical behaviour, emphasis is placed on the key significance of using a dialogical model of education when teaching literature. Although the main focus of the paper is an investigation of texts suitable for Key Stage Four pupils, it is argued, in the conclusion, that a range of appropriate literary texts can also be identified and utilised for younger pupils. Reference is also made, in the concluding section, to complementary research by the present author which reported on the classroom field-testing of some ‘Troubles’ literature similar to that identified in the current paper; in the earlier research, however, the target group was a representative selection of sixth-formers from across Belfast’s ghettoised communities, and the exclusive focus was conflict resolution.en
dc.format.extent211451 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.iacsee.org/journal.phpen
dc.subjectAspects of the global dimensionen
dc.subjectPupils (and above) in Northern Irelanden
dc.titleA Shared Humanity. Using Literature To Develop The Global Dimension For Key Stage Four Pupils (And Above) In Northern Ireland: An Investigationen
dc.typeArticleen
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