Minority-language Education in a Situation of Conflict: Irish in English-medium Schools in Northern Ireland

2.50
HDL Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/18235
Title:
Minority-language Education in a Situation of Conflict: Irish in English-medium Schools in Northern Ireland
Authors:
McKendry, Eugene
Abstract:
While Irish-medium education has developed strongly over the last 20 years, most Irish speakers in Northern Ireland learn the language in English-medium schools, which currently provide the majority of teachers in the bilingual Irish-medium sector. This paper discusses the background to Irish in Northern Ireland from the plantation of Ulster to the aftermath of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. The Linguistic Atlas of Ireland and census returns provide demographic data. The position of Irish in the education system must be evaluated in the context of languages provision in the curriculum in general, not only in Northern Ireland, but in the UK as a whole. The lower status that Irish had in the European Union until recently has relegated it to a disadvantaged curricular position, where schools can only offer the subject after provision is guaranteed for major mainland continental languages. Examination entries figures are analysed to trace trends in uptake. Curriculum reviews in Britain and Northern Ireland that make languages optional from age 14 in a more crowded curriculum are discussed. While Irish should remain a reasonably popular choice for pupils, the future of the language in English medium schools in Northern Ireland is not assured.
Affiliation:
School of Education, Queen’s University Belfast
Citation:
The International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism Vol. 10, No. 4, 2007, p394-409
Journal:
The International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/18235
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1367-0050
Appears in Collections:
Irish-Medium Education

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcKendry, Eugene-
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-14T10:14:12Z-
dc.date.available2008-02-14T10:14:12Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationThe International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism Vol. 10, No. 4, 2007, p394-409en
dc.identifier.issn1367-0050-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2428/18235-
dc.description.abstractWhile Irish-medium education has developed strongly over the last 20 years, most Irish speakers in Northern Ireland learn the language in English-medium schools, which currently provide the majority of teachers in the bilingual Irish-medium sector. This paper discusses the background to Irish in Northern Ireland from the plantation of Ulster to the aftermath of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. The Linguistic Atlas of Ireland and census returns provide demographic data. The position of Irish in the education system must be evaluated in the context of languages provision in the curriculum in general, not only in Northern Ireland, but in the UK as a whole. The lower status that Irish had in the European Union until recently has relegated it to a disadvantaged curricular position, where schools can only offer the subject after provision is guaranteed for major mainland continental languages. Examination entries figures are analysed to trace trends in uptake. Curriculum reviews in Britain and Northern Ireland that make languages optional from age 14 in a more crowded curriculum are discussed. While Irish should remain a reasonably popular choice for pupils, the future of the language in English medium schools in Northern Ireland is not assured.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectcurriculumen
dc.subjectschoolsen
dc.subjectEnglishen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectIrishen
dc.subjectNorthern Irelanden
dc.titleMinority-language Education in a Situation of Conflict: Irish in English-medium Schools in Northern Irelanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Education, Queen’s University Belfasten
dc.identifier.journalThe International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualismen
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