2.50
HDL Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/49039
Title:
Improving Schools, Developing Inclusion
Authors:
Ainscow, M; Booth, T; Dyson, A; Farrell, P; Frankham, J; Gallannaugh, F; Howes, A; Smith, R
Publisher:
Routledge
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/49039
Additional Links:
http://www.tlrp.org/dspace/handle/123456789/744; http://www.routledge.com/shopping_cart/search/search.asp?search=Improving%20Schools,%20Developing%20Inclusion
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Description:
Books in the Improving Learning series are explicitly designed to support “evidence-informed” decisions in educational practice and policymaking. In particular, they combine rigorous social and educational science with high awareness of the significance of the issues being researched. Despite the efforts that have been made to bring about improvements in the schools, some children and young people remain marginalised by current arrangements. The development of more inclusive schools remains one of the biggest challenges facing educational systems throughout the world. However, inclusion remains a complex and controversial issue, and the development of inclusive practices in schools is not well understood. In Improving Schools, Developing Inclusion the authors challenge many existing assumptions about school improvement and educational reform, and propose that the development of inclusive practice will only be achieved by engaging in dialogue about the deeply held beliefs of teachers and policy-makers. In doing so, they provide a new way of thinking about how schools can be made more inclusive. The authors consider (1) implications for the work of school leaders; (2) How staff teams can work together in order to address barriers to participation and learning (3) How schools can collect and use evidence in order to strengthen their practices (4) The critical and alternative perspectives to which schools need access and (5) The implications for relationships between schools, local authorities and researchers. At a time when policy-makers and practitioners are searching for more effective ways of responding to student diversity, this challenging book offers powerful messages as to what needs to be done to move schools in a more inclusive direction.
Appears in Collections:
Inclusion

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAinscow, M-
dc.contributor.authorBooth, T-
dc.contributor.authorDyson, A-
dc.contributor.authorFarrell, P-
dc.contributor.authorFrankham, J-
dc.contributor.authorGallannaugh, F-
dc.contributor.authorHowes, A-
dc.contributor.authorSmith, R-
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-13T13:17:06Z-
dc.date.available2009-02-13T13:17:06Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2428/49039-
dc.descriptionBooks in the Improving Learning series are explicitly designed to support “evidence-informed” decisions in educational practice and policymaking. In particular, they combine rigorous social and educational science with high awareness of the significance of the issues being researched. Despite the efforts that have been made to bring about improvements in the schools, some children and young people remain marginalised by current arrangements. The development of more inclusive schools remains one of the biggest challenges facing educational systems throughout the world. However, inclusion remains a complex and controversial issue, and the development of inclusive practices in schools is not well understood. In Improving Schools, Developing Inclusion the authors challenge many existing assumptions about school improvement and educational reform, and propose that the development of inclusive practice will only be achieved by engaging in dialogue about the deeply held beliefs of teachers and policy-makers. In doing so, they provide a new way of thinking about how schools can be made more inclusive. The authors consider (1) implications for the work of school leaders; (2) How staff teams can work together in order to address barriers to participation and learning (3) How schools can collect and use evidence in order to strengthen their practices (4) The critical and alternative perspectives to which schools need access and (5) The implications for relationships between schools, local authorities and researchers. At a time when policy-makers and practitioners are searching for more effective ways of responding to student diversity, this challenging book offers powerful messages as to what needs to be done to move schools in a more inclusive direction.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tlrp.org/dspace/handle/123456789/744en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.routledge.com/shopping_cart/search/search.asp?search=Improving%20Schools,%20Developing%20Inclusionen
dc.subjectinclusionen
dc.subjectimproving schoolsen
dc.subjectschool improvementen
dc.titleImproving Schools, Developing Inclusionen
dc.typeBook chapteren
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