2.50
HDL Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/49114
Title:
Barriers to success? Disability identity in Higher Education
Authors:
Panting, C; Kelly, K
Publisher:
Conference at Hope University, Liverpool
Issue Date:
May-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/49114
Additional Links:
http://www.tlrp.org/dspace/handle/123456789/549
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The concept of student success in this paper focuses on access issues for disabled students with hidden impairments. The necessity for these students to adopt a disability identity in order to access teaching and learning support in higher education will be critically theorised with supporting empirical data. This paper discusses students’ concept of a disability identity, with reference to their hidden impairments. Although students who volunteered for this study described themselves as disabled students, their relationship to disability is not so straightforward. Early analysis of interview data from students with hidden impairments show that they tend to conceptualise disability as being physical, supporting Deal’s (2003) theory of hierarchies of impairment. When talking about their own impairments, description focuses on particular support needs or specific issues. This seems to challenge the social model of disability being an holistic identity. These findings support Olney and Brockelman (2003) who argue that disability identity is transient; one is disabled according to the situation, not as a constant state of being. Many of the students only describe themselves as disabled in relation to their teaching and learning support needs. When no support is needed, there is no need for a disability identity. Interestingly, students do not view the label of disability negatively. Though none would chose to describe themselves as disabled, they believe the identity is useful in accessing support and explaining support to their peers. Concluding discussion centres on the possible implications these findings may have on students’ help-seeking behaviour. This support may contribute to higher retention rates of disabled students in higher education.
Appears in Collections:
Special Educational Needs

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPanting, C-
dc.contributor.authorKelly, K-
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-15T11:55:55Z-
dc.date.available2009-02-15T11:55:55Z-
dc.date.issued2006-05-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2428/49114-
dc.descriptionThe concept of student success in this paper focuses on access issues for disabled students with hidden impairments. The necessity for these students to adopt a disability identity in order to access teaching and learning support in higher education will be critically theorised with supporting empirical data. This paper discusses students’ concept of a disability identity, with reference to their hidden impairments. Although students who volunteered for this study described themselves as disabled students, their relationship to disability is not so straightforward. Early analysis of interview data from students with hidden impairments show that they tend to conceptualise disability as being physical, supporting Deal’s (2003) theory of hierarchies of impairment. When talking about their own impairments, description focuses on particular support needs or specific issues. This seems to challenge the social model of disability being an holistic identity. These findings support Olney and Brockelman (2003) who argue that disability identity is transient; one is disabled according to the situation, not as a constant state of being. Many of the students only describe themselves as disabled in relation to their teaching and learning support needs. When no support is needed, there is no need for a disability identity. Interestingly, students do not view the label of disability negatively. Though none would chose to describe themselves as disabled, they believe the identity is useful in accessing support and explaining support to their peers. Concluding discussion centres on the possible implications these findings may have on students’ help-seeking behaviour. This support may contribute to higher retention rates of disabled students in higher education.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherConference at Hope University, Liverpoolen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tlrp.org/dspace/handle/123456789/549en
dc.subjectdisability identityen
dc.subjecthidden impairmentsen
dc.subjectdisabled studentsen
dc.subjecthigher educationen
dc.subjectdisabilityen
dc.subjectbarriers to learningen
dc.titleBarriers to success? Disability identity in Higher Educationen
dc.typeArticleen
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