2.50
HDL Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/49216
Title:
Education and neuroscience: evidence, theory and practical application
Authors:
Howard-Jones, P
Affiliation:
University of Bristol
Publisher:
Routledge/ Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Educational Research, 50(2):119-201
Issue Date:
Jun-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/49216
Additional Links:
http://www.tlrp.org/dspace/handle/123456789/1266; http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=issue&issn=0013-1881&volume=50&issue=2
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Between 2005 and 2006, the ESRC-TLRP seminar series ‘Collaborative Frameworks in Neuroscience and Education’ brought together over 400 teachers, neuroscientists, psychologists and policy-makers to discuss the potential for collaborative work that might lead to improved educational and neuroscientific understanding. This Special Issue of Educational Research brings together and examines many of the issues and opportunities highlighted by the seminar series. The Special Issue begin with a provocative article by John Geake scrutinising some of the most popular ideas about the brain to be found in today’s classroom. While they have usually been inspired by something related to neuroscience, any scientific basis has been so seriously misinterpreted, over-interpreted and/or misapplied that they are classified here as ‘neuromyths’. Usha Goswami reviews what we know about the core neural systems involved with learning to read and the biological basis of developmental dyslexia. Goswami demonstrates convincingly that existing studies suggest dyslexia is associated with an under-activation of key networks involved with reading, but also notes the shift during normal development of the brain areas involved with language as they become increasingly left-lateralised in most readers. The third paper by Sashank Varma and Daniel Schwartz ask how should educational neuroscience conceptualise the relation between cognition and brain function in mathematical reasoning. Liane Kaufmann, in her paper, draws attention to developmental differences in the neural mechanisms linking numerical processing and the use of fingers. The contribution by Lauren Stewart and Aaron Williamon provides a pioneering review of literature considering the neural basis of music and issues of cultural context and individual differences. In the final contribution, Howard-Jones, Winfield and Crimmins explore reports on an interdisciplinary attempt to co-construct pedagogical ideas spanning neuroscience and education. The context was drama education, but the findings echo some of the general issues highlighted by other authors in this issue. Attached file: Table of contents with links to each of the TLRP papers and a full-text reproduction of the Editorial (by kind permission of Routledge/Taylor & Francis)
Appears in Collections:
Neuroscience and Education

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHoward-Jones, P-
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-16T13:09:41Z-
dc.date.available2009-02-16T13:09:41Z-
dc.date.issued2008-06-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2428/49216-
dc.descriptionBetween 2005 and 2006, the ESRC-TLRP seminar series ‘Collaborative Frameworks in Neuroscience and Education’ brought together over 400 teachers, neuroscientists, psychologists and policy-makers to discuss the potential for collaborative work that might lead to improved educational and neuroscientific understanding. This Special Issue of Educational Research brings together and examines many of the issues and opportunities highlighted by the seminar series. The Special Issue begin with a provocative article by John Geake scrutinising some of the most popular ideas about the brain to be found in today’s classroom. While they have usually been inspired by something related to neuroscience, any scientific basis has been so seriously misinterpreted, over-interpreted and/or misapplied that they are classified here as ‘neuromyths’. Usha Goswami reviews what we know about the core neural systems involved with learning to read and the biological basis of developmental dyslexia. Goswami demonstrates convincingly that existing studies suggest dyslexia is associated with an under-activation of key networks involved with reading, but also notes the shift during normal development of the brain areas involved with language as they become increasingly left-lateralised in most readers. The third paper by Sashank Varma and Daniel Schwartz ask how should educational neuroscience conceptualise the relation between cognition and brain function in mathematical reasoning. Liane Kaufmann, in her paper, draws attention to developmental differences in the neural mechanisms linking numerical processing and the use of fingers. The contribution by Lauren Stewart and Aaron Williamon provides a pioneering review of literature considering the neural basis of music and issues of cultural context and individual differences. In the final contribution, Howard-Jones, Winfield and Crimmins explore reports on an interdisciplinary attempt to co-construct pedagogical ideas spanning neuroscience and education. The context was drama education, but the findings echo some of the general issues highlighted by other authors in this issue. Attached file: Table of contents with links to each of the TLRP papers and a full-text reproduction of the Editorial (by kind permission of Routledge/Taylor & Francis)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledge/ Taylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tlrp.org/dspace/handle/123456789/1266en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=issue&issn=0013-1881&volume=50&issue=2en
dc.subjectneuroscienceen
dc.subjectneuroscience and educationen
dc.titleEducation and neuroscience: evidence, theory and practical applicationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bristolen
dc.identifier.journalEducational Research, 50(2):119-201en
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