The impact of policy on the English learning and skills sector

2.50
HDL Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/49235
Title:
The impact of policy on the English learning and skills sector
Authors:
Finlay, I; Edward, S; Steer, R
Publisher:
Routledge/Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Journal of Vocational Education & Training 59(2):121-270
Issue Date:
Jun-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/49235
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This TLRP Special Issue presents a collection of papers based on ‘The impact of policy on learning and inclusion in the learning and skills sector’, a research project funded from January 2004 until July 2007 by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as part of their Teaching and Learning Research Programme (TLRP). The main aim of the project was to evaluate the impact of national policy on teaching, learning and inclusion in the sector, with a particular focus on three groups of learners who have been poorly served by their previous education: unemployed people in adult and community learning centres (ACL), low-skilled adult employees in work-based learning (WBL) and younger learners on Level 1 and Level 2 vocational courses in further education (FE) colleges. The first paper, by Ian Finlay, Ken Spours, Richard Steer, Frank Coffield, Maggie Gregson and Ann Hodgson, provides a critical review of policy documents on teaching, learning and assessment in the sector. The second paper, by Sheila Edward, Frank Coffield, Richard Steer and Maggie Gregson, explores the perspectives of tutors and managers working in the learning sites on the impact of policy on themselves and on their learners. In the following paper, Richard Steer and the rest of the team provide an overview of the changing use of policy ‘levers’ in the sector from the days of the Training and Enterprise Councils to the latest model employed by the LSC, with a particular focus on targets, funding, inspection, planning and initiatives. Ken Spours, Frank Coffield and Maggie Gregson then focus on the FE sector and provide an alternative explanation of why colleges have found it so difficult to respond to the plethora of government initiatives aimed at improving the quality of learning. Next, Ann Hodgson, Sheila Edward and Maggie Gregson look at the turbulence in basic skills provision in the community in the lifetime of our project, as growth of services and funding on an unprecedented scale has given way to anxiety about financial cuts. In the last of the papers from the research team, ‘Flowers in the desert’, Ian Finlay, Ann Hodgson and Richard Steer describe provision for learning in the workplace, which blossoms quickly with the injection of funding, but which can wither just as quickly if funds are withdrawn. The two final papers, by Mary Hamilton and Phil Hodkinson respectively, are from colleagues outside the research team who agreed to provide a commentary on our work and link it to their own.
Appears in Collections:
Policy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFinlay, I-
dc.contributor.authorEdward, S-
dc.contributor.authorSteer, R-
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-16T13:54:53Z-
dc.date.available2009-02-16T13:54:53Z-
dc.date.issued2007-06-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2428/49235-
dc.descriptionThis TLRP Special Issue presents a collection of papers based on ‘The impact of policy on learning and inclusion in the learning and skills sector’, a research project funded from January 2004 until July 2007 by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as part of their Teaching and Learning Research Programme (TLRP). The main aim of the project was to evaluate the impact of national policy on teaching, learning and inclusion in the sector, with a particular focus on three groups of learners who have been poorly served by their previous education: unemployed people in adult and community learning centres (ACL), low-skilled adult employees in work-based learning (WBL) and younger learners on Level 1 and Level 2 vocational courses in further education (FE) colleges. The first paper, by Ian Finlay, Ken Spours, Richard Steer, Frank Coffield, Maggie Gregson and Ann Hodgson, provides a critical review of policy documents on teaching, learning and assessment in the sector. The second paper, by Sheila Edward, Frank Coffield, Richard Steer and Maggie Gregson, explores the perspectives of tutors and managers working in the learning sites on the impact of policy on themselves and on their learners. In the following paper, Richard Steer and the rest of the team provide an overview of the changing use of policy ‘levers’ in the sector from the days of the Training and Enterprise Councils to the latest model employed by the LSC, with a particular focus on targets, funding, inspection, planning and initiatives. Ken Spours, Frank Coffield and Maggie Gregson then focus on the FE sector and provide an alternative explanation of why colleges have found it so difficult to respond to the plethora of government initiatives aimed at improving the quality of learning. Next, Ann Hodgson, Sheila Edward and Maggie Gregson look at the turbulence in basic skills provision in the community in the lifetime of our project, as growth of services and funding on an unprecedented scale has given way to anxiety about financial cuts. In the last of the papers from the research team, ‘Flowers in the desert’, Ian Finlay, Ann Hodgson and Richard Steer describe provision for learning in the workplace, which blossoms quickly with the injection of funding, but which can wither just as quickly if funds are withdrawn. The two final papers, by Mary Hamilton and Phil Hodkinson respectively, are from colleagues outside the research team who agreed to provide a commentary on our work and link it to their own.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledge/Taylor and Francisen
dc.subjectpolicyen
dc.subjectteachingen
dc.subjectlearningen
dc.subjectassessmenten
dc.subjectlearning and skills sectoren
dc.titleThe impact of policy on the English learning and skills sectoren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Vocational Education & Training 59(2):121-270en
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