Improving Learning, Skills and Inclusion: The Impact of Policy on Post-Compulsory Education

2.50
HDL Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/49240
Title:
Improving Learning, Skills and Inclusion: The Impact of Policy on Post-Compulsory Education
Authors:
Coffield, F; Edward, S; Finlay, I; Hodgson, A; Spours, K; Steer, R
Publisher:
Routledge/ Taylor & Francis
Issue Date:
Mar-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/49240
Additional Links:
http://www.tlrp.org/dspace/handle/123456789/1063; http://www.routledgeeducation.com/books/Improving-Learning-Skills-and-Inclusion-isbn9780415461818
Type:
Book
Language:
en
Description:
This is the first book to examine the turbulent but important learning and skills sector both from above, by interviewing the officials responsible for it, and from below, by talking to hundreds of learners and front-line staff. Even though this sector caters for over 6 million learners and will play a key role in how prosperous and fair the UK will become, it is not well understood by practitioners or policy-makers. For over three years, the authors explored the interactions between these two groups by examining how policy is created and enacted in further, adult and work-based learning. Our data are presented as a series of stories: the learners’ experiences, the plans of the policy-makers to bring about radical change, and the struggles of tutors and managers, juggling both change and continuity. We also explain how the sector as a whole operates, as policy is mediated and translated by numerous actors at different levels. Our main finding is that the sector is undergoing a fundamental shift from area-based planning to a more marketised ‘demand-led system’ intended to give employers and learners more say over provision. Our evidence suggests that this high-risk strategy may destabilise FE colleges and other education providers and exclude disadvantaged learners. We outline the elements of an alternative system, underpinned by three principles: putting the relationship between tutor and learner at the heart of the new system; placing the claims of equity for once above the demands for economic efficiency; and ensuring a more moderate pace of change. Our alternative is based on ‘devolved social partnership’, where power is more equally shared between government and employers, trade unions, professionals and community representatives. This book is an invaluable resource for tutors, managers and institutional leaders in FE Colleges, Adult and Community Learning Centres and Work Based Learning sites.
Appears in Collections:
InclusionPolicy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCoffield, F-
dc.contributor.authorEdward, S-
dc.contributor.authorFinlay, I-
dc.contributor.authorHodgson, A-
dc.contributor.authorSpours, K-
dc.contributor.authorSteer, R-
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-16T15:38:34Z-
dc.date.available2009-02-16T15:38:34Z-
dc.date.issued2008-03-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2428/49240-
dc.descriptionThis is the first book to examine the turbulent but important learning and skills sector both from above, by interviewing the officials responsible for it, and from below, by talking to hundreds of learners and front-line staff. Even though this sector caters for over 6 million learners and will play a key role in how prosperous and fair the UK will become, it is not well understood by practitioners or policy-makers. For over three years, the authors explored the interactions between these two groups by examining how policy is created and enacted in further, adult and work-based learning. Our data are presented as a series of stories: the learners’ experiences, the plans of the policy-makers to bring about radical change, and the struggles of tutors and managers, juggling both change and continuity. We also explain how the sector as a whole operates, as policy is mediated and translated by numerous actors at different levels. Our main finding is that the sector is undergoing a fundamental shift from area-based planning to a more marketised ‘demand-led system’ intended to give employers and learners more say over provision. Our evidence suggests that this high-risk strategy may destabilise FE colleges and other education providers and exclude disadvantaged learners. We outline the elements of an alternative system, underpinned by three principles: putting the relationship between tutor and learner at the heart of the new system; placing the claims of equity for once above the demands for economic efficiency; and ensuring a more moderate pace of change. Our alternative is based on ‘devolved social partnership’, where power is more equally shared between government and employers, trade unions, professionals and community representatives. This book is an invaluable resource for tutors, managers and institutional leaders in FE Colleges, Adult and Community Learning Centres and Work Based Learning sites.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledge/ Taylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tlrp.org/dspace/handle/123456789/1063en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.routledgeeducation.com/books/Improving-Learning-Skills-and-Inclusion-isbn9780415461818en
dc.subjectpolicyen
dc.subjectlearning and skillsen
dc.subjectinclusionen
dc.subjectpost-compulsory educationen
dc.titleImproving Learning, Skills and Inclusion: The Impact of Policy on Post-Compulsory Educationen
dc.typeBooken
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