Autonomy, conditions and constraints: some cross-cutting themes from ‘Learning How to Learn – in classrooms, schools and networks’

2.50
HDL Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/49638
Title:
Autonomy, conditions and constraints: some cross-cutting themes from ‘Learning How to Learn – in classrooms, schools and networks’
Authors:
James, M; McCormick, R; Marshall, B; Pedder, D; Carmichael, P
Abstract:
The project aimed to link research conducted across organisational levels – in classrooms, in schools and across networks. This paper provides an overview of the project at the end of the funding period. Although analysis had focused particularly on the separate levels, and some across level analysis remains to be done, several cross-cutting themes, linking our levels, have emerged: 1. Autonomy and agency. Our theoretical analysis led us to consider the development of learning autonomy as a central concept in learning how to learn (LHTL). Promoting learning autonomy also emerged as a key factor in our quantitative survey of teachers and is confirmed by our interviews and videos of classroom practice. All data sources point to the importance of teachers’ own sense of agency as crucial in creating the conditions for pupils’ voices to be heard and their autonomy to be enhanced. The application of formative principles in teachers’ own learning emerges as a strong theme. 2. Conditions for classroom change: support for teachers’ in-class learning Teacher learning and school support for such learning are key preconditions for the sustained promotion of LHTL in classrooms. Our data indicated that the conditions in project schools appeared to be conducive to teachers’ learning out of the classroom but less amenable to teachers’ learning with colleagues in the classroom. Yet, it was teachers’ in-class learning practices that were most strongly associated with their classroom promotion of LHTL. School conditions that underpinned teachers’ in-class learning practices centred on the development of a clear sense of direction, the promotion of staff development, the auditing of teachers’ expertise and support for teacher networking. 3. Compliance and subversion as responses to the policy context. Interviews with headteachers and school co-ordinators revealed their concerns about leading learning in their schools within the context of prescriptive government policy. All schools were implementing government policies but with varying degrees of enthusiasm, locating themselves on a spectrum of compliance to subversion. Government policies were successful in leaving a depth of imprint on school practice and shaping the discourse which accompanied it. However, the greater the external pressure, the greater was the desire for flexibility, diversification and agency.
Publisher:
TLRP
Issue Date:
Nov-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2428/49638
Additional Links:
http://www.tlrp.org/dspace/handle/123456789/507
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Assessment

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJames, M-
dc.contributor.authorMcCormick, R-
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, B-
dc.contributor.authorPedder, D-
dc.contributor.authorCarmichael, P-
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-19T15:17:29Z-
dc.date.available2009-02-19T15:17:29Z-
dc.date.issued2005-11-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2428/49638-
dc.description.abstractThe project aimed to link research conducted across organisational levels – in classrooms, in schools and across networks. This paper provides an overview of the project at the end of the funding period. Although analysis had focused particularly on the separate levels, and some across level analysis remains to be done, several cross-cutting themes, linking our levels, have emerged: 1. Autonomy and agency. Our theoretical analysis led us to consider the development of learning autonomy as a central concept in learning how to learn (LHTL). Promoting learning autonomy also emerged as a key factor in our quantitative survey of teachers and is confirmed by our interviews and videos of classroom practice. All data sources point to the importance of teachers’ own sense of agency as crucial in creating the conditions for pupils’ voices to be heard and their autonomy to be enhanced. The application of formative principles in teachers’ own learning emerges as a strong theme. 2. Conditions for classroom change: support for teachers’ in-class learning Teacher learning and school support for such learning are key preconditions for the sustained promotion of LHTL in classrooms. Our data indicated that the conditions in project schools appeared to be conducive to teachers’ learning out of the classroom but less amenable to teachers’ learning with colleagues in the classroom. Yet, it was teachers’ in-class learning practices that were most strongly associated with their classroom promotion of LHTL. School conditions that underpinned teachers’ in-class learning practices centred on the development of a clear sense of direction, the promotion of staff development, the auditing of teachers’ expertise and support for teacher networking. 3. Compliance and subversion as responses to the policy context. Interviews with headteachers and school co-ordinators revealed their concerns about leading learning in their schools within the context of prescriptive government policy. All schools were implementing government policies but with varying degrees of enthusiasm, locating themselves on a spectrum of compliance to subversion. Government policies were successful in leaving a depth of imprint on school practice and shaping the discourse which accompanied it. However, the greater the external pressure, the greater was the desire for flexibility, diversification and agency.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTLRPen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tlrp.org/dspace/handle/123456789/507en
dc.subjectlearning how to learnen
dc.subjectformative assessmenten
dc.subjectautonomyen
dc.subjectpolicyen
dc.subjectpupil voiceen
dc.titleAutonomy, conditions and constraints: some cross-cutting themes from ‘Learning How to Learn – in classrooms, schools and networks’en
dc.typeArticleen
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